The G-Spot is a Myth, Apparently

It’s bad news for men and women everywhere. Research pretty much says that the G-Spot – an allegedly highly erogenous area – may, in fact, be a myth. Considering that some men typically have trouble finding the elusive fantasy spot, the female orgasm may be in serious jeopardy here. But is there more to this mystery than first thought?

First appearing in 1982, the concept of the existence of the G-Spot or Grafenberg spot was first published in a popular book on human sexuality, quickly making it as widely accepted as the now infamously debunked alpha-male study. With this, however, comes some issues regarding evidence.

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G-Spot is a Myth

Published to the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology way back in September 2001, author Terence M. Hines from Pace University believes the evidence is far too weak to support the reality of the G-spot. Taking aim specifically at anecdotal observations, Terence reckons these “case studies made on the basis of a tiny number of subjects are not supported by subsequent anatomic and biochemical studies.” The study, which went on to form the basis for this claim examined only 12 women, of whom only five “had” a G-Spot.

Addiego F, Belzer was the first to coin the term back in 1981, reorganising research from a 1950 paper that proposed the existence of such an area. Fast forward half a century, and despite wide-acceptance of the phenomenon “supporting evidence is minimal at best.”

The article covers more than just the G-Spot, however, with the author also reviewing claims regarding the nature of female ejaculation. Or as they put it, “evacuation of the female prostate induced by orgasmic contractions of the muscles surrounding the female urethra”. Analysis of female ejaculated fluid show it shares similarities with males, giving rise to the idea that the G-Spot is actually the female prostate.

Due to the acceptance of the myth, Terence fears “many women have been seriously misinformed about their bodies and their sexuality.” Suggesting that women who “fail” to find their G-Spot may feel “inadequate or abnormal.” In his conclusion, Terence admonishes the “widespread acceptance of the reality of the G-Spot” as a result of poorly conducted studies, before stating that if the G-Spot did exist, it would not “have gone unnoticed for all these years.”

Adam Ostrzenski MD, PhD, Dr Hab took this challenge and ran with it back in 2012. Aiming to identify the anatomic structure of the G-Spot, Ostrzenski was able to distinguish its location on the dorsal perineal membrane. How did he do it – a stratum-by-stratum vaginal wall dissection on a fresh cadaver. Juicy.

While he was able to document the anatomic existence of the G-Spot, potentially impacting the practice and clinical research in the field of female sexual function, a review of the literature in the same year concluded that “all published scientific data point to the fact that the G-Spot does not exist,” once again putting doubts on the popular speculation.

For now, we’ll just stick with Hines and his statement regarding the search for the apparently mythical spot.

“Until a thorough and careful histologic investigation of the relevant tissue is undertaken, the G-Spot will remain a sort of gynecologic UFO: much searched for, much discussed, but unverified by objective means.”

Check it out

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Top 5 Toys To Get Your Partner Going

While the G-Spot may or may not be a myth, these toys are sure to get your partner going. Spend a little or spend a lot, we’ve got what she needs.

Lelo – Soraya Wave Luxurious Rabbit Massager

Bondage Boutique – Adjustable Nipple Clamps

Agent Provocateur – Precious Playsuit

Zalo – Baby Heart Personal Massager

Lelo – $2,900 24 Karat Gold Earl Butt Plug